Statistics on teen dating sex

The Washington State Attorney General's office already has a number of resources available to help, including: Schools, parents, teachers, and community organizations all can help identify dating violence and provide support for abuse victims.

But teens themselves must also learn how to reach out and help friends who are victims of relationship abuse.

In the Darwinian world of high-school dating, freshman girls and senior boys have the highest chances of successfully partnering up. And they have found that for the most part, they're accurate.

Now, however, social scientists have examined them exhaustively and empirically.

Emotional abuse is much harder to recognize, but no less damaging.

At the 2008 Summer Meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General, Attorneys General from across the nation passed a resolution encouraging schools to develop teen dating violence awareness curriculum.

Economists Peter Arcidiacono and Marjorie Mc Elroy of Duke and Andrew Beauchamp of Boston College examined an enormous trove of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, more commonly known as The poll asked a broad range of questions about health and behavior—and the data set has become the basis of dozens of famed medical, sociological, and economic studies.

Some 35% of teens have some type of experience in a romantic relationship, a figure that includes current and former daters, as well as those in serious and less-serious relationships.

The survey asked about three different categories of romantic relationships and found: Some 64% of teens indicate that they have never been in a romantic relationship of any kind (and 1% declined to provide their relationship status).

The 35% of teens who say they are either currently involved with a romantic partner or have ever dated, hooked up with or had a romantic relationship with someone will serve as the focus of the remainder of this report.

While 29 percent of heterosexual youth surveyed reported being physically abused by dating partners, for example, 42.8 percent of LGB youth reported the same.

The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.